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Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Ivory Coast Singer/Songwriter Meiway - "Miss Lolo" (Video, & Comments About This Song & About The Nzema Akan Language)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about the Ivorian singer/songwriter Meiway and showcases a YouTube video of his hit song "Miss Lolo".

Selected comments from the discussion thread of this video are included in this song, with particular attention to comments about Meiway's ethnic group Nzema (Nzima), also known as Appolo, and the traditional language of that ethnic group.

Some information about the Nzema language is included in the Addendum to this post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Meiway for his musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this YouTube example.

NOTE: This song is about women with big breasts. For this reason and because of some scenes of dancing that would be considered "twerking" in the USA, this video may not be considered suitable for viewing in some public schools in that nation.

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INFORMATION ABOUT MEIWAY AND INFORMATION ABOUT HIS MUSIC GENRE "ZOBLAZO"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meiway
"Frederic Desire Ehui , best known as Meiway (born 17 March 1962 in Grand Bassam), is a singer from the Ivory Coast.[1] He is most notable for pioneering the Zoblazo style.[1] His hits include "Miss Lolo".

Meiway
Birth name: Frederic Desire Ehui
Born: 17 March 1962 (age 55)
Grand-Bassam, Ivory Coast
Genres: Zoblazo
Occupation(s): Singer/Songwriter
Years active:1989–present

****
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zoblazo
"Zoblazo is a musical style from Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, created in the early 1990s. It is a cosmopolitan popular dance music with simple up-tempo rhythm and high tech instrumentation and contains a mixture of traditional dance rhythms from southern Côte d'Ivoire.

Zoblazo's best known exponent is Freddy Meiway, who has released a series of Zoblazo records starting in 1989 with the record "Ayibebou" with his group Zo Gang. An ethnic N'Zema from Grand Bassam, Meiway integrated folk rhythms from Côte d'Ivoire and Ghana with and is danced to with a white handkerchief. From his second album in 1990 entitled 200% Zoblazo, Meiway became the second best known Ivorian and N'zema musician after Alpha Blondy, and has released a steady stream records, the most recent 9ème commandement –900% zoblazo released in 2007."

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SHOWCASE VIDEO - Meiway - Miss Lolo



Melynga Published on Dec 1, 2012

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
These comments are presented in chronological order with the oldest comments by year given first, except for replies. Numbers are assigned for referencing purposes only.

1. Jennifer Peter, 2012
"Me and my sister listened to this when we was 2 years old"

****
2013
2. Patrick Kwame Ankamah
"Abrobea star, dis guy throu his ghanaian background he's got our knowledge more without limited bcos he's got knowledge of both countrys ghana and cote d'ivoire.Anyway i like his music he's talented,.gud job bro."

**
3. Ganiwu Dey Ymcmb Boss
"A Dey Feel This Song Soo Much"

**
4. janetkissjanetkiss
"I like the fact that he singing about how much he likes women with big breast but yet it hasn't been sexualised . . . (if you know what I mean)"

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2014
5. OyOdiMe
"I'm Nigerian. I enjoy this song, but not sure if my ears are deceiving me, why does some of what he's saying sound like Twi (Ghana language, that I understands too)...."

**
Reply
6. Denyse Adom
"its nzema and a lil french"

**
Reply
7. LaKarwie94
"It's actually apollo. It's an akan group. The akans originated from ghana. That's why it may sound like twi a lot of akan people can understand twi because it's similar and vice versa. But there are differences though"

**
Reply
8. LaKarwie94
"And some french in there because it's from Côte d'Ivoire and we speak french as the national language"

**
Reply
9. Denyse Adom
"Apollo is the same as nzema"

**
Reply
10. LaKarwie94
"+Denyse Adom are you aboure? because I'm aboure and when we talk about Apollo we say nzima. But most people know them as apollo."

**
Reply
11. Denyse Adom
"I am an akan from Ghana specifically nzema my grandmother used to call it Apollo that's why I think it's the same"

**
Reply
12. Modeste Faton
"+Denyse Adom ada ada"

**
Reply
13. Marvel Hammond
"He is actually Ghanaian Ivorian ))"

**
Reply
14. ThaCuteOne __
"+Marvel Hammond you're right i think he is im ivorian"

**
Reply
15. James Dadzie
"He was born in a part of ghana where the language spoken is Nzema. That language is a dialect of the Akan language which includes twi.....so there u go"

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Reply
16. ThaCuteOne __
"+LaKarwie94 im aboure aswell!!"

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Reply
17. A. Lionel C. Kouadjani, 2015
"+OyOdiMe
It is the same linguistic root even there share the same tradition. Ashanti empire"

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Reply
18. ThaCuteOne __
"ohhh thanks. I was wondering why i could understand some of their words."

**
Reply
19. R.G.A.vlogs, 2016
"He's Ghanaian and Ivorian"

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Reply
20. Nick Pop, 2016
"Meiway is purely Ivorian, it's just that some ethnic group in Ivory Coast are Akan and have a similar culture as Ghanaians and are originally from the Ashanti Kingdom."

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21. shona rose
"Iam from DRC ,but i love this song so much even if i don't understand what they are saying ,but whenever i listen to it i feel goose pimples and i do believe as they say that music has no border"
-snip-
"DRC" = Democratic Republic of the Congo (Congo Kinshasa)

**
Reply
22. Manni Dennis, 2015
"That's that African Pride...we ALL have them 😂 1⃣❤️Mama Africa"

**
23. saneba whyte
"Ghanaian based in ivory coast...
.the language is French and Nzema mostly"

**
Reply
24. pinkrose4446
"We all know he's Ivorian"

**
Reply
25. Yaw Antwi, 2017
"Meiway dad is Ghanaian"

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Reply
26. BAM BOUM, 2017
"NO MEIWEY A DAD IS BéTé and MOTHER IS APPOLO is CONTRY in IVORY COAST 100%"

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27. isaac owusu ansah, 2015
"Ghanaian from kumasi ashanti Region but currently Live ASIA...i am understand some on this language...onyame nhyira wo paa...ghana twi language, mean may god bless you alway,s love it."

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2016
28. Joseph Amosu
"What country is this man from 😊 can some one please tell me?"

**
Reply
29. Félix Dasylva
"Ivory Coast"

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Reply
30. beats lover
"he is ivorian born from nzema tribe of ghana and ivory coast.. the akan nzema ppl stretch thru ivory coast too."

**
31. Sekou Sacko
"Super cool je aime ça"
-snip-
"je aime ça" = (French) "I like this".

**
32. romuald dadios
"good song bro meiway
lolo is breast"

**
33. griiffin wafula
"am from Kenya but I love this song, even though I don't understand the words. what is lol?"

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Reply
34. Julien
"griiffin wafula they are Talking about Boobs of the ivorian womens"

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35. Kwame Nyame
"It's funny how colonialism can separate groups of people and families. Ivorians say Niamen (something like that) Ghana say Nyame
Kouasi = Kwesi
Koffi = Kofi

I can go on and on. And for a while i thought we were completely different people, because they are heavily influenced by France and Ghana Britain .
I can pick out some words that he is saying (not the French though)"

**
Reply
36. BRENDA BROWN
"kwame while I agree with you,I think there is still a difference between Asantes and Nzema concerning words so even if there were no partition of Africa ,there would still be that difference😊"

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Reply
37. Kwame Nyame
"BRENDA BROWN totally agree but definitely can say that we are all Akan people and for a while I thought only Ghana had Akans"

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Reply
38. BRENDA BROWN
"+Kwame Nyame haha ohk yeah. it is just that the akans makes a bigger part of the population"

**
Reply
39. Malika Silla, 2017
"Kwame Nyame
We say kouamé, Kouao, Kouassi, Kassi, Yao, assemoi, assamoi...
Do you Ghanaians have a word like yako?"

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Reply
40. Kwame Nyame, 2017
"Malika Silla I'm sure we do, but I probably have to hear the pronunciation to determine. We read things in an English way and Ivorians in a French way. Like Assamoi = Asamoah
Yao = Yaw
Kouamé = Kwame (my name 😁)"

**
Reply
41. Kwame Nyame, 2017
"Malika Silla like my name would be Kouamé Niamen = Kwame Nyame"

**
Reply
42. Malika Silla, 2017
"Kwame Nyame
In Ivory Coast we say yako to someone who is feeling or felt pain. It may be physically as well as inside."

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Reply
43. Kwame Nyame, 2017
"Malika Silla hahaha yes we actually do say that to someone not feeling well. Mainly used when someone has lost a loved one we say it Yaako.
I am totally loving this."

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44. AY Blackie
"😂😂😂😭 Am I the only one hearing twi words in this song? "wo nofo bebrebe"."

**
Reply
45. ahmmsh
"The whole east half of Ivory Coast speak Nzema (Nkrumah's people), Anyin, Baule and Fanti, so they are definitely Akans. Believe me, they can understand Twi but they pretend in front of Ghanaians haha. Like Togolese people all speaking Ewe, or Burkinabe people speaking Mole-Dagomba and Frafra.. It's just colonial borders, they used to all be under Asanteman and Dagbon Empire before Britain and France colonised the place and divided it."

**
Reply
46. AY Blackie
"+ahmmsh Good info. Thanks."

**
Reply
57. beats lover
"this language is the akan nzema of ivory coast and ghana.. he is nzema man of ivory coast.. from akan tribe that stretches thru ghana and ivory tribe.. nice one"

**
Reply
48. beats lover
"nzema ppl are akans.. most part of ivory coast was for gold coast till french bought the lands from british.. which means many ghanaians living on that land became ivorians .. thats why nzema ppl r in ivory coast too.. freddy is on nzema man"

**
49. George Obah
"What year was this video shot, noticed all the ladies are on wrapper, no trouser, not even one lady"

**
Reply
50. Rachel van der Acquah, 2017
"George Obah 2002"

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2017
51. Marise Mendes
"J'aime bien cette chanson mais j'ai ne suis pas de la côte d'ivoire qlqu'un peut il me dire ce qu'il est entraint de dire merci beaucoup"
-snip-
(Google Translate from French to English)
"I like this song but I'm not from the Ivory Coast ql can anyone tell me what it is he has to say thank you very much"

**
Reply
52. kassy ebah
"Marise Mendes il dit qu'on va pas à la chasse pour chercher des os mais plutôt de la chair ou viande si tu veux..."
-snip-
(Google Translate from French to English)
"Marise Mendes says that we do not go hunting to look for bones but rather flesh or meat if you want"

**
Reply
53. Marise Mendes
"kassy ebah merci beaucoup de la part de congolais de la RDC👋👋👌👌"
-snip-
(Google Translate from French to English)
"Thank you very much from the Congolese part of the DRC"

**
54. aaye aaye
"il chante en quelle langue? c'est quoi son groupe ethnique?"
-snip-
(Google Translate from French to English)
"He sings in what language? What is his ethnic group?"

**
Reply
55. kassy ebah
"aaye aaye en apolo akan"

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ADDENDUM - INFORMATION ABOUT CENTRAL TANO (AKAN) LANGUAGES AND THE NZEMA LANGUAGE
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Central_Tano_languages
"The Central Tano or Akan languages are languages of the Niger-Kongo family (or perhaps the theorised Kwa languages[2]) spoken in Ghana and Ivory Coast by the Akan people."

**
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nzema_language
"Nzema (Nzima), also known as Appolo, is a Central Tano language spoken by the Nzema people of southwestern Ghana and southeast Ivory Coast. It shares 60% intelligibility with Jwira-Pepesa and is close to Baoule."

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Monie Love - "Monie In The Middle" (video, lyrics, and comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about the British Hip Hop artist Monie Love and showcases her 1990 song "Monie In The Middle".

The lyrics of this song are included in this post along with selected comments from this discussion threads, with particular attention to comments about Monie Love and this song and comments that include African American Vernacular English (AAVE) slang. I've also included my comments about the AAVE words and phrases used in some of these comments.

The content of this post is presented for historical, cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Monie Love for her musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publisher of this YouTube example.

Hat tip to commenter* monie Love for reminding me of this song.

*Commenter monie Love posted a comment in the discussion thread for this 2015 pancocojams post: https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/07/kata-mwanangu-kata-swahili-music-dance.html "Kata Mwanangu Kata" (Swahili music dance video with English translation). Her comment reminded me of the "Monie In The Middle" song.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT MONIE LOVE
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monie_Love
"Monie Love (born Simone Gooden; July 2, 1970) is an English rapper and radio personality in the United States. She is a well-respected figure in British hip hop, and made an impact with American hip-hop audiences as a protégé of American emcee Queen Latifah, as well as through her membership in the late-1980s/early-1990s hip-hop group Native Tongues. Love was one of the first BritHop artists to be signed and distributed worldwide by a major record label. Love was born in the Battersea area of Wandsworth, London. She is the younger sister of techno musician Dave Angel, and was the daughter of a London-based, jazz musician father.

Musical career
Love began her musical career as an emcee in the British Jus Bad crew, which featured DJ Pogo, Sparki, and MC Mell'O'. The group released the single "Free Style/Proud" on the independent Tuff Groove record label in 1988. Manager Steve Finan was introduced to her by Rodney P. Steve Finan signed Monie Love to Danny D and Peter Edge at Cooltempo Records in the UK, and then Benny Medina at Warner Brothers in the United States. Monie Love first gained critical and commercial notice in the United States in 1989 for her cameos on Queen Latifah's Grammy Award-winning and pro-feminist single "Ladies First", on Adeva's "Ring My Bell", on the Jungle Brothers' single "Doin' Our Own Dang" and on De La Soul's hit single "Buddy". The acclaim led her to a recording contract with Warner Bros. Records, making Love one of the few British hip-hop efforts released by a major label. She also has a place in hip-hop history as a member of the Native Tongues, a collective that included Queen Latifah, De La Soul, A Tribe Called Quest, the Jungle Brothers, and a number of other acts. Her versatility was demonstrated with her involvement in the emerging popularity of house music with her own single "Grandpa's Party" as well as providing rap vocals for the Dancin' Danny D Remix of Adeva's house hit "Respect".

Love's debut album, Down To Earth, spawned two, Grammy-nominated hits, "Monie in the Middle" (a track dealing with a woman's right to determine what she wants out of a relationship) and "It's a Shame (My Sister)" (which sampled The Spinners' "It's a Shame", written for the band by Stevie Wonder) and featured house-music vocalist and then-labelmate Ultra Naté. The album reached #26 on the Top R&B/Hip-Hop Albums chart.[1]" ...

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO" Monie Love - Monie In Middle



revenant7605, Uploaded on May 7, 2007
-snip-
This video publisher mistakenly wrote that this song was from the 1980s. Actually, it was released in 1990.

****
LYRICS: MONIE IN THE MIDDLE
(Simone Gooden, aka Monie Love)

Brother what is with you, you can't take a hint?
I need to shove a splint between your eyes for you to see
You and me were never meant to be
Your homeboy likes me, I like him too, get out the picture
I get your point but I'm not rolling with the punch
I scrunched up the letter you wrote me in lunch
In 5th period I pay no notice to your motion
My work is on the table, my pen's in locomotion
Every time I turn around, you're looking at my face
I try to ignore you, the bell rings, I race out the room
Zoom to another room, sit down, what do you know?
The lover's in town
The other brother (Who?) The one I want to talk to
Sitting three seats back, and I'mma walk over to him
And give him the letter I wrote
Because my feelings towards him are brewing, ya know?

Monie in the middle (Where she at?) In the middle
Yep, Monie's in the middle (Where that at?) In the middle
Monie in the middle (Where she at?) In the middle
(Go Mon, Mon, what is she?) Monie in the middle (Repeat 2x)

In 7th the knucklehead walks in and sits down beside me
I said "Yo, why you trying to ride me?"
Day in and day out I can't seem to get you off my back
What do you think I should do about that?
In fact it's embarrassing, what a buffoon
You even follow me in the ladies bathroom
Give me a break, I can't take it, the stakes are too high
Besides, there goes the other brother
I'm not Keith Sweat, so don't sweat me
The other brother's smooth approach is what gets me
He intrigues the Mon you know
So I suggest the course towards me you blow
You're wasting time pursuing Monie
Cause she's pursuing the lover only
And as my mother did she told me
Go for what you know, Mo, yo

Monie in the middle (Where she at?) In the middle
Yep, Monie's in the middle (Where that at?) In the middle
Monie in the middle (Where she at?) In the middle
(Go Mon, Mon, what is she?) Monie in the middle (Repeat 2x)

Bringing matters to a close and everybody knows
That I'm no longer in the middle
I made my decision, precisely, precision is a must
For me to solve another riddle
Step into a brand new rhythm,-ism schisms
Nope, I'm not with 'em, I've given
My undivided attention, you know what I'm saying?
No type of games I'm playing when

Monie in the middle (Where she at?) In the middle
Yep, Monie's in the middle (Where that at?) In the middle
Monie in the middle (Where she at?) In the middle
(Go Mon, Mon, what is she?) Monie in the middle (Repeat 4x)


Source; https://genius.com/Monie-love-monie-in-the-middle-lyrics

Song explanation from that page:
comment published by Feather, 2011
"From the album “Down to Earth” in 1990

Sampled Bad Bascomb’s “Black Grass” (1972) and Coke Escovedo’s “I wouldn’t change a thing” (1976).

Monie is caught in the middle of 2 young men at school-one guy she is trying to get attention from and another guy that she can’t get to leave her alone."

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THAT VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
These comments are presented in chronological order with the oldest comments by year given first, except for replies. Numbers are assigned for referencing purposes only.

Note: I compile selected comments and include them with the videos that I showcase on pancocojams in part because of their historical and folkloric information (for instance, the memories that the commenters share and the vernacular terms that are used).

Another reason that I include selected comments from these videos' discussion threads is to provide examples of comments from YouTube comment threads that don't include profanity, sexual explicit words, the use of "the n word", argumentative or trolling comments, and other content that I don't want to read (and I think some other people may also not want to read. However, this is only a small portion of the comments in that video's discussion thread that don't include profanity etc.

Total number of viewers (as of April 25, 2017, 12:12 pm) - 842,145 views
Total number of comments (as of April 25, 2017, 12:12 pm) - 606


1. ChocDiva75, 2007
"O M G !!! Man, I ain't seen this video in ages, yo! I am such a huge fan of hers. You brought back some serious memories for me...LOL"

**
2. Gr8muta, 2007
"This was the JAM!"

**
3. mrmoore1970, 2007
"This was my jam back in eary-to-late 1990! I wonder what Monie Love is doing these days?! The last I heard about her, she was DJ here in Philly on 100.3 The Beat, after that, she sorta disappeared, at least from Philadelphia radio. This song and "Ladies First" w/ Queen Latifah were my jams back in the day!"

**
4. rufus317, 2007
"BET used to kill this video!"
-snip-
BET = Black Entertainment Television (an American television station that, in its early days, used to play Black music videos).

In the context of this sentence, "kill" means "play a lot"

**
5. you317, 2007
"Monie has such a great voice. Very sharp and confident delivery."

**
6. timbalandj, 2007
"The girl on the hook is Leshaun formerly known as Almond Joy who appeared on L.L. Cool J's "Doin it" studio version but not in the video due to her pregnancy"
-snip-
"hook" - the repeated lyrics in a song

**
7. Nima Warfield, 2008
"Truck jewelry on the "Where she at?" backup sista, fo' real. Peep the earrings, yo...."

**
8. lashawntee8 years ago
Yup they use to snatch our earrings in Philly....I cant tell you how many I got taken from me....But anyway it was a great era for us...Now im 41 years old...still love old skool.
-snip-
Girls who wore these type of earrings would take them off if they were getting ready to fight or else the earrings would be ripped off of them, and their ears would probably be torn.

Other comments about these earrings can be found below.

**
9. kim4hoff4, 2008
I love the whole Native Tongue movement.
-snip-
"Native Tongue" was a group that Monie Love belonged to before she went solo.

**
10. Giovanni Centurione
"She got some sweat ass words in dis and all her tracks. This style needs to comeback"
-snip-
I think that the word "ass" here is used as an intensifier to mean "really sweet" or "very sweet".

Sweet = "very good", dope, hip, cool, the bomb etc.

**
11. ltinsley2, 2009
"man i miss the old days! '89 was a good year for hip hop. thanks for posting"

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Reply
12. ltinsley2, 2009
"my bad this was 1990! still a classic
-snip-
"My bad"= an informal phrase meaning "my mistake"; "sorry"
-snip_
"My bad" is supposed to be immediately said if you accidentally did something wrong (such as stepped on someone's foot) to avert having to experience any serious consequences.

**
13. utbr0, 2009
"CLASS SICK!!! still da bomb!!"
-snip-
"Class" probably means "Classic". "sick and "the bomb" mean the same thing as the comment immediately below.

**
14. shoowtime, 2009
"Outstanding."

**
15. Kasino Royale, 2009
"Hardcore hiphop heads clowned this back in the day. The same way they clowned Will Smith. Those same people now swear this is 'real' rap and clown the younger artist. I swear we as a culture just like to hate. Rap goes in cycles. Monie is no different than todays Lil Momma. JoeSki Love n the Peewee Herman is no different from Solja Boys Crank that. Funny the older we get, the more we change our past. We laugh at em with their pants hanging off but we had clothes inside out just 2 name a few fads"
-snip-
"clowned" = made fun of

**
16. Dj Skief, 2009
"LONDON ENGLAND stand up!! Real HIP HOP music. This song is HUGE! never will there be music like this again."

**
17. 1nfamous76, 2009
"SOUTH LONDON UK stand up, she used to live about 5 mins from my crib, went same school as my sister - Walsingham Girls in Clapham. SO PROUD OF HER"
-snip-
Stand up = a common saying that is a clip of "Stand up and be counted", the same meaning as "give a shout out to ___, "recognize" (give recognition to __)

"crib"= home

**
18. Dj Skief, 2010
"Classic hip hop. I love this track. Shot out to LONDON ENGLAND"
-snip-
"Shot out"= typo for "Shout out" [giving deserved recognition to]

This comment isn't a reply, but is presented here because of its content.

**
19. freshPrincess626, 2009
"i gotta say, that yellow and white jacket she got on is pretty fly.
DANG i miss being a 90s kid!"
-snip-
"fly" = hip, in the latest urban street style

**
20. Sylentera, 2009
"I love Monie's flow..I miss the old Mcees.."
-snip-
"flow" = the way a person raps

MCees "Mcs" = rappers, as compared to DJs (the record technicians, the persons who spinned the records that the MCs rapped to)

**
21. parkay301, 2009
"mc lyte, queen latifah and monie had so much style and class. they were so different, but so pleasurable to listen to."

**
22. TheChyckClique, 2009
"For some reason I always thought Monie reminded me of Left Eye or vice versa."

**
23. Anne Hamilton, 2013
"A little cutie, she reminds me of Left-eye from TLC, when the group first started in the
early 90's...God rest her soul."

**
24. superfly1200, 2015
"omg Left Eye did sound like her in the beginning glad changed and rapped her own style"

**
25. Gee Man, 2017
"clearly Monie was who left eye Lopez idolized."
-snip-
These three comments aren't replies, but are added here because of their content.

**
26. sweetcherry4282, 2009
"This is straight 90's. Cross colors in full effect. I miss these days.
-snip-
"straight" = definitely

"Cross Colors" was a popular brand of clothing (among Hip Hop fans) that combined different colors in the same garment.

**
27. thaporndawgz1, 2009
"this track isnt exactly old skool.Old skool would be kurtis blow,grandmaster flash,the treacherous 3.music that came out during the break dance era.which would be the late 70s throw the 80s"
I would know,I was there.

**
28. LilNancyDrew, 2010
"Hey look, look, look, A real rapper."

**
29. ENJ4321, 2010
"@equeen222 Not just Lauryn Hill homie.There is Rah Digga,Jean Grae,Lady Luck,ill E Gal,Lady Of Rage,Lady Sovereign,Missy Elliot,Da Brat, and of course Left Eye.None of the ones on the list I said used any sexuality to sale albums, the are just women that can rhyme.Don't get it twisted though Kim,Foxy,Eve, Shawnna,Trina, and La Chat can spit as well as a man."
-snip-
I can't find the comment this is written in reply to, but I gather the commenter said that Lauryn Hill was the only female rapper that didn't use sexuality to sell albums. "spit"= "rap"

**
30. Moniqtee, 2010
"haha! Moni in the Middle! Everybody used to sing this song to me when I was a kid... I was in 7th grade! I know this song VERSE FOR VERSE! You know this! Pure classic!"

**
31. Carmaker1, 2010
"@janetenn This is 90s with an 80s flavor. It's barely over half a year into 1990, so that's why it seems 80s. That is reason why the 80s and early 90s are frequently grouped together. This was shot around September 1990."

**
32. Dawon Broaddus, 2010
"Love the ol school video. The earrings clothes and everything. That's how ma sisters use to dress."

**
33. 124sexylady, 2011
"Monie is from England and she rapped like she was born and raised in NY!! She was a very good rapper back in the day..too bad she only had a few tracks out there in the early 90's..Miss u Monie!!"

**
34. kjamai26, 2011
"This was the days when rap was fun & easy to dance to. No profanity, nudity or degrading terms for women."

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35. zachary guerrero, 2011
"monie love spits fire"
-snip-
spits= raps ; fire [lyrics (bars) that are really hot (good).

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36. RELL SHEEZE5 years ago
she killed this joint! i was in love with her as a kid! still am! lol... marry me!!!"
-snip-
"Killin"= excelling in what you say or do; doing something really well

joint- jam, track, tune, song, record

**
37. Michael Hamby, 2011
"Classic. Whatever happend to Monie Love. This was out when De La Soul's, "3 feet high and rising" broke big. Played these CD's over and over."

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38. 91Definite, 2011
"@wmhamby Monie Love last album was in '93 "In a word or 2". Then in '00 she made some type of EP called "Sice of da Pie" and that was really it of her. She had other dreams she wanted to pursue, but she still is around alot of events of hip hop. She had her own show on a radio station in Philly but she left cause of Young Jeezy they had a argument about hip hop..It's on youtube search it up. But man she was a beastress on the mic though :)p"
-snip-
"beatress" = a female beast ("beast" = a person who excels in what he [or she] does; "monster" is also used this way to refer to someone who does something powerful, beyond 'mere mortals".

Note: I've never seen or heard "beastress" used before. This commenter may have coined that term.

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39. SlimmArmstrong, 2011
"@cigarlounge1 I TOTALLY agree..but let's give Monie all her props..she's a real MC..easily top 10 of all females, and could roast some of the brothas, too"

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40. MrDamonLJohnson, 2011
"LOL! I remember when all the girls, including my sisters, used to wear those big hats and bamboo earrings. Ahh....the memories....."
-snip-
Those big earrings were informally called "door knockers" because that's what they looked like.

**
41. te4888, 2011
"i used to do that dance she did at the end in like the 4th grade. so dope."
-snip-
"so dope" = so cool (hip, good)

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42. kiddkevo, 2012
"Crank dat Spongebob dance @ 2:49 lmaoo"
-snip-
"Crank dat" [that] = do the [name of dance], for example "Crank that Soulja Boy"

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43. superskullmaster, 2012
"From 2:49 onward, they killin that Spongebob, of course back then it wasn't called the spongebob."

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44. Mari Amygdahlia, 2013
"She nailed this one. Horns and Hip Hop match made in heaven!"

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45. Nellzartworx, 2013
"She was so ill, highly underrated"

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46. VW DT, 2013
"Old girl Monie Love flow is raw as hell. Whatever the topic she is rhyming about u know she going to come with a hard and swift delivery. Thatz what makes/made her so ill.And that hook although basic is sick too."
-snip-
All of these adjectives and adjectival phrases: 'raw as hell", "hard and swift", "ill", and "sick" are highly complimentary African American Vernacular English descriptors. And in the context of this comment, "old girl" is an affectionate term for a woman who may not even be old in chronological terms.

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47. TigerLikesTail, 2013
"The female rappers from the UK always got me..
First The Cookie Crew & Then Monie :-)
This track is about Big Daddy Kane of all people lol.
Google this term (D-Nice Presents True Hip-Hop Stories: Monie Love) you will see what I am saying"

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48. Sharon Scu, 2013
"She said this was based on real life with Big Daddy Kane & one of his dancers..."

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49. Levi stgermain, 2013
"hightop 90s fade , my cousin in his teen had a hightop fade in 1990 or 1991 when this song came out. i think i was 10 years old that time, when this song came out it was FUNKY.
-snip-
"hightop fade"= popular late 1980s and early 1990s young Black male "style of haircut where hair on the sides is cut off or kept very short while hair on the top of the head is very long" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi-top_fade

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50. Feenix, 2013
"I still cant believe shes from the UK"

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Reply
51. Sylvester Boson, 2014
"there were a few old school rappers from the UK"

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Reply
52. MrLanzie, 2014
"why not?"

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55. Feenix, 2014
"+MrLanzie Cos she looks and sounds like a Yank

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Reply
56. MrLanzie, 2014
"+fffeeenixxx Oh right, in the mid 80s UK rappers would often put on an american accent. she moved to the USA and married one of the jungle brothers.
Slick Rick, Young MC and MF Doom are also originally from the UK."

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57. Jeffrey Blake, 2014
"I still love monie love!"

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58. Curtis Anderson, 2014
"Monie Love was not a one hit wonder. She hosts Ladies First on Sirius Xm radio. This hit song is one of many, classic. Go Monie!"

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59. PAC Cap, 2014
"This what I call real hip hop.

Omg I love this girl so much , I miss you monie , god bliss you sis."

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Reply
60. PAC Cap, 2014
"Long Live Simone Gooden ."

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61. Phaedo13, 2014
"ah the good old days when rap was just fun, not the mass commercialized garbage that it has now become"

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Reply
62. asds92, 2014
"+Phaedo13 Maaaaaaaan you ain't lying! I miss those days"

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Reply
63. Yvonne Juju, 2015
"+Phaedo13 YOU TOOK the words OUT OF MOUTH"

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Reply
64. Scott Robert, 2015
"It's heartbreaking to realize. Thankfully we were blessed by this and able to smile about it."

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Reply
65. LostJomper, 2015
"+Phaedo13 well, I guess you never heard nowadays good rap, dont be that superficial and search for it :P"

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66. Eguzzisme, 2015
"I remember having this cassette and rewinding it over and over again so I could learn the whole song. It took me a few day to learn to rap as fast as she did in this song. I haven't heard it in about 20 years, and I still know every word! LOL. I think I just impressed both of my teenagers!! 😂😂"

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67. Lejuan Dean, 2016
"I love the old school round the way girl vibes! New York back then was the bomb... all the way up until the Juice days. The girl popping up behind Monie was so Funny!! "Where She At?""

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Reply
68. Sean D. Martin, 2016
"That's Leshaun....she was the one that did the vocals to L.l.. Cool J song doing it.....she's still around she does interior design now"

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Reply
69. John Bell, 2016
"old school?"

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Reply
70. Lejuan Dean, 2016
"Hey, that was cool to learn. Thank You!!! ;)... I loved her in this song."

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Reply
71. Lejuan Dean, 2016
"Yep Old School Hip Hop, and If you don't know look it up."

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72. John Bell, 2016
+Lejuan Dean Blak ppl r the only to label their music ... old at 40s?

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Reply
73. manfocused, 2017
"We had CRAZY fun in Brooklyn back in the day. I was 17 when this joint came out (going to Boys and Girls HS), and I remember those days well. We was even doing the "Sponge Bob"(@ 2:55) before it had a name. Lol."

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74. Lejuan Dean, 2017
"We do label our music, you're right! Because in some form or fashion ... whatever has changed or become non existent with the times, becomes filed in another category such as Old School. To Me, this song and era is considered old school hip hop versus what garbage we have on the radio today. It was a message, a vibe, dances and styles that now make you reminisce back to that Era."

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75. Vince West, 2016
"I love that steppin in the back. Still smooth ...!"

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76. ATLien4Life, 2016
"She proved "Black don't crack". In her mid 40's and is gorgeous..."
-snip-
The familiar African American saying "Good Black Don't Crack" refers to the belief that Black people don't physically show their age as much as White people.

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77. 20 MIC, 2016
"she was harder than 90% of the cats out now and then."

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78. 20 MIC, 2016
I wish she come back yo.

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79. Ray Asay, 2016
"I missed q 102 philly and hot 97 New York back then playing great tracks like these! Wow I wish YouTube and iPads existed back in the early 1990s so I didn't have to hope to find tracks like these by sheer luck on the radio and hope there was good reception! Haha"

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80. ProudToBe AnAmerican, 2016
"Haha. Where were you that Hot 97 wouldn't come in good? I was in Queens. My radio was constantly recording!"

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81. manfocused, 2017
"What's funny is this song/video came out 27 years ago and the young kids today don't look or dress any different from the young brothers in the back dancing @ 2:46 - 2:51. Youngins today are even rocking the same haircuts WE rocked back then. @ 2:55, y'all called that dance the "Sponge Bob" in '07. We was doing that dance 17 years before that and we didn't even have a name for it. Lol."

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Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, April 24, 2017

New York Times 2014 Article Excerpt "White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier" (with Selected Reader Comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This panococojams post provides a brief excerpt of a December 24, 2014 New York Times article about race entitled "White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier".

Selected comments from that article's discussion thread are also included in this post.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural purposes.

I recommend visitors to this blog read this entire article.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Carl Zimmer, the writer of this NYT article and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
EXCERPT FROM THIS FEATURED NYT ARTICLE
Pancocojams Editor's Note: This excerpt is necessarily brief. However, I strongly recommend that this blog's visitors who are interested in this subject read the entire article which, among other points, mentioned some differences that the reasearch found in racial classifications in different states in the USA.

From https://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/25/science/23andme-genetic-ethnicity-study.html?_r=0
White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier by Carl Zimmer, DEC. 24, 2014
..."In the United States, there is a long tradition of trying to draw sharp lines between ethnic groups, but our ancestry is a fluid and complex matter. In recent years geneticists have been uncovering new evidence about our shared heritage, and last week a team of scientists published the biggest genetic profile of the United States to date, based on a study of 160,000 people.

The researchers were able to trace variations in our genetic makeup from state to state, creating for the first time a sort of ancestry map.

“We use these terms — white, black, Indian, Latino — and they don’t really mean what we think they mean,” said Claudio Saunt, a historian at the University of Georgia who was not involved in the study.

[...]

“This year we saw that we were in a great position to do the analysis,” said Joanna L. Mountain, senior director of research at 23andMe.

On average, the scientists found, people who identified as African-American had genes that were only 73.2 percent African. European genes accounted for 24 percent of their DNA, while .8 percent came from Native Americans.

Latinos, on the other hand, had genes that were on average 65.1 percent European, 18 percent Native American, and 6.2 percent African. The researchers found that European-Americans had genomes that were on average 98.6 percent European, .19 percent African, and .18 Native American

[...]

Jeffrey C. Long, an anthropologist at the University of New Mexico who was not involved in the study, cautioned that the research was not based on a random sample of Americans. Instead, Dr. Mountain and her colleagues studied only people who were curious enough about their DNA to pay for a test.
“Perhaps people who have mixed ancestry are more interested in their ancestry than people who don’t think they have mixed ancestry,” Dr. Long said.

David Reich, a geneticist at Harvard University and a co-author on the new study, acknowledged this was a reasonable concern. “It’s classic survey bias,” he said. But Dr. Reich also noted that the new results were consistent with smaller studies done in the past."...

****
SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS FEATURED ARTICLE
This discussion thread has a total of 267 comments. The comment section for this article is closed.
I read many of the comment in this discussion, but I didn't read all of them. I believe that these selected comments are representative of the ones that I read.

I've only added a few editorial comments in this compilation, and I haven't visited any of the websites that are given as hyperlinks in some of these comments.

For the record, I share the same name as a commenter in this discussion thread (A Powell, December 26, 2014). However, that commenter isn't me and she isn't quoting me. I just happened upon this article and its discussion thread on April 24, 2017.

All of the comments in this discussion were published between December 24, 2015- December 26, 2014. This compilation presents these selected comments in relative chronological order with comments from December 24, 2014 given before those published after that date, except for replies. Numbers have been assigned to these comments for referencing purposes only.

****
From https://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/25/science/23andme-genetic-ethnicity-study.html?_r=0
White? Black? A Murky Distinction Grows Still Murkier by Carl Zimmer, DEC. 24, 2014 [selected comments]

1. Greg Brooklyn NY December 24, 2014
"I'm looking forward to the day when people who are asked their race just say, "Human being"."

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2. x y December 25, 2014
"How about looking froward to the day when people don't ask?"

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2. Alan Church Florida December 24, 2014
"Sounds to me like a good case for getting rid of hyphenated ethnic categorization entirely and all the baggage associated with it."

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Reply
4. AB Maryland December 24, 2014
"Getting rid of hyphens won't convince white people to accept Americans of African descent."

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5. Bert Schultz Philadelphia December 24, 2014
"The categoey of race is a social comstruct, it is mot based om biology. "The White Race" was imvented from Northern European protestants and gradually expanded to inclide Irish, Italians, and most recently Jews."

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Reply
6. Josh Hill, New London, December 24, 2014
"I suspect that the reason that people with less than 28 percent African ancestry identify as white is because a common myth notwithstanding it isn't visually apparent at low rates of admixture.

Back in the days of Jim Crow, when people of mixed race were white enough many moved to another town and "passed for white" to escape the status of second-class citizen. In many cases, the secret wasn't passed on and their descendants don't know that they have African ancestry.

It's true as well that society has changed to the point at which the one drop rule is no longer as significant as it once was. While my African ancestry is fractional and as such isn't visually apparent, as a boy, I was legally black in some states, and even up north I was considered black by those who knew I had African ancestry. Now attitudes have changed significantly and classification seems to correspond more closely to visual appearance, in that someone who looks part black is referred to as black, but those like me who don't are typically referred to as white, Hispanic, or (most appropriately, I think) mixed."

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7. Josh Hill, New London December 24, 2014
"Steve, I think you're misinterpreting the article, which said that "*European-Americans* [emphasis added] had genomes that were on average 98.6 percent European, .19 percent African, and .18 Native American." In other words, the group that was on avereage 0.19% African includes *both admixed* and non-admixed European Americans, who make up the majority. If you look at only admixed of European-Americans, you will find the percentage of black admixture significantly higher than 0.19%, as it would have to be, given the time frame during which most of the ancestral admixture occurred.

That being said, I don't dismiss your point -- the figures I've seen elsewhere suggest that admixture percentages among self-identifying whites with black ancestry are on average lower than admixture percentages among self-identifying blacks. I don't see that this effects my hypothesis, however, regarding the significance of visual identification of the individual and his or her family. There is in fact a great deal of evidence that this occurs, and that it occurred historically; the race fraction laws and one drop rule were in fact anomalies, both historically and geographically, and when people could "pass for white" they frequently did."

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8. Jorge The Dominican Republic December 24, 2014
"What about European-Americans with Asian genomes or the other way around ?? What about African Americans with Asian genomes or the other way around ?? what about Latinos with Asian genomes or the other way around ?? now include in this matrix Native Americans.......for example Native Americans with Asian genomes or the other way around........and what about Arabs and Jews ?? would this test discriminate between European and Jewish genomes ?? Arab-Americans with Native American genomes ???"

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9. Josh Hill, New London December 24, 2014
"Yes, it does make those discriminations and if you send your DNA to 23 and Me or a similar service you'll get a breakdown. I, for example, am 0.1% Yakut, whatever that is. (OK, I actually know because I looked it up in Wikipedia.) One caveat, though: these tests are not 100% accurate, although they've gotten better with time. There are a number of reasons for that, including limited samples, the difficulty of distinguishing between closely-related people (French and German, say), and different criteria.
For example, thie test measures African admixture, but when did that occur, in the last few hundred years on these shores, or 2000 years ago in the Roman Empire? It's known that there were admixture events at both times. Typically, the tests will attempt to set a cutoff date, e.g., admixture based on populations 400 years ago, and this will affect results.

Also, 23 and Me breaks out Ashkenazi Jewish as a separate category, but Ashkenazi Jewish is actually a mixture of largely Middle Eastern and European. So if like me you show up as about half Jewish, you don't get a breakdown of the European and Middle Eastern components of your ancestry. Other tests don't do this so the results can look very different.
Personally, I've noticed that my 23 And Me analysis gets closer and closer with time to what I know of my ancestry, e.g., it's correctly identifying as Iberian Spanish and Portuguese ancestors who were originally identified as Italian."

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10. Will N, Los Angeles December 24, 2014
"Look farther back. When the first Europeans arrived, when the first African people arrived. I think you'll find more mixing very early on. (The Spanish were in North Carolina in 1500s, English 1600s).
Orangeburg, County SC where my family is from there's a term for tri-racial, Euro-African-Indian: Brass Ankles. I'm proud to say I've got brass ankles. My genome results has many Hispanics which I've yet to learn the connection. We're all mixed, we're all related. Racism is not just wrong, it's ridiculous."

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11. Lowell D. Thompson Chicago December 24, 2014
Mr. Zimmer,

The idea of "race" has always been more of a political, cultural and even religious concept than a scientific one.

And until our "leaders" finally face up to and begin to undo the legacy of color coding and "branding" the human species, we in the USA will be building on the shaky foundation of our greatest crime - slavery and the dehumanization of folks like moi.

Right?
Http://RaceManAnswers.com"

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12. vacciniumovatum Seattle December 24, 2014
"It depends on how you define mixed ancestry.

My ancestors came from Spain, Iraq, Iran, Russia and Lithuania. The US government says I'm white but I don't identify as that since I look like my Middle Eastern relations and I think of white as being European, like my mom's side of the family. And since I have Spanish heritage on my dad's side, that makes me part Hispanic (although his family was tossed out of Spain by Ferdinand and Isabella), although I don't identify that way either.

I hear a lot about identifying which East Asian country people's ancestors come from. I wish that "white" was split into Europe (west of the Urals and north of the Mediterranean) and Middle Eastern/Mediterranean. If I'm to be pigeonholed, let's do a better job of sticking me in a hole.

Or we can throw the "hole" concept away..."

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13. William Case Texas December 25, 2014
"Spaniards, Iranians, Russians and Lithuanians are Indo-Europeans (a language group) while most Iraqis are Arabic. They are all classified as Caucasian, or white. Skin color can vary as dramatically within racial groups as between racial groups. You don't have to have blond hair and blue eyes to be considered white. Most Mexican Americans self-identify as white."

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14. Reader New York December 25, 2014
"I agree about throwing out the whole concept, but whiteness is a political and social construct that shapes lives and appears not be going away anytime soon. In the late 19th, early 20th century, far fewer groups were considered "white" than are now. A book on the immigration of Italians is called "White on Arrival": At the time large numbers of Italians came to the U.S. they were perceived as white, which they wouldn't have been in the past. Being viewed as white gave them an advantage.

http://www.amazon.com/White-Arrival-Italians-Chicago-1890-1945/dp/019517"

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15. Rebecca Fayetteville, AR December 24, 2014
"Most genetic genealogists think that ethnic tracing through autosomal DNA is primitive and unreliable, due to lack of pure baseline populations. This may change in the future but consider any "results" you may get at 23andMe or FamilyTreeDNA to be tentative. Mitochondrial DNA and yDNA are much more reliable, but they represent only tiny slivers of a pedigree. Mitochondrial is one's mother's mother's mother's mother's line back to the metaphorical Eve. yDNA is one's father's father's father's father all the way back to the metaphorical Adam. Autosomal is everything in between but only back to the 1500s-1600s."

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16. Rebecca Fayetteville, AR December 24, 2014
"Any article that stimulates conversation about race is a good article."

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17. Avocats WA December 24, 2014
"Actually, other than those discussing the fact that there are no real "races," we don't need more discussion of race."

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18. Suzie Siegel Tampa, FL December 24, 2014
"I got a free test from 23andMe as part of a project to help people with sarcoma, a rare cancer. The results were so fascinating that I paid ($99) for a test for my adopted sister. It has spurred me to begin work on my family tree.

The article doesn't mention that 23andMe isn't as good at Native American ancestry for people whose ancestors belonged to tribes now part of the U.S. Apparently, they haven't participated as much for fear others will try to use the results to claim benefits."

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19. Sleater, New York December 24, 2014
"At no point does this article mention the words "white supremacy," which have underpinned American discussions of and social, economic and political policies around race and racism since the 1600s. Why is "white supremacy," which explains that Virginia law and the "Pocahantas Exception," and so much more, not mentioned at all? Why does the author, like so many, not want to talk about how white supremacy underpins our current discourse on and about race? It's so frustrating seeing this elision/omission occur over and over. It's not that hard to grasp, either."
-snip-
The "Pocahantas exception to Virginia's 1924 "Racial Integrity Act" which prohibited interracial marriage, initially defined White people as having "no known, demonstrable or ascertainable admixture of the blood of another race but white. Because some of Virginia's most prominent families had claimed to be descended from Pocahontas, the legislature revised the act indicating that "Virginians could be up to one-sixteenth Native American and still be white in the eyes of the law." However, they could not have any other racial mixture.


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20. David California December 24, 2014
"The President, a man who is half white and half black, is universally thought of and referred to as black. We have far to go."

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Reply
21. Historian Aggieland, TX December 25, 2014
"What are white folks worried about? He was rised by white folks just like they were. But the Obamas' genealogy adds some interesting aspects to this discussion. The President has some slave ancestry--on his white side! http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/30/us/obamas-mother-had-african-forebear-.... Mrs. Obama also has some white ancestors she acquired by the more conventional means: a slave owner or his son impregnating a slave woman."
-snip-
This hyperlink doesn't appears to be viable.

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22. William O. Beeman San José, CA December 24, 2014
"Anthropologists have established that the concept of "race" is mythology. It is in no way a scientifically valid concept. Variation within a given group is greater than between groups, and overt markers such as skin color are selectively attended. We are all mutts."

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23. Mary Kay Klassen Mountain Lake, Minnesota December 25, 2014
"I have a sister who was repeatedly asked if she was an Indian or Jewish, as she took after my mother's side of the family with dark skin, almost black hair, who all had Swiss ancestry, and after my dad's side of the family whose mother was from eastern Europe, and the whole family all had very big noses. My daughter-in-law on the other hand, whose father is from Ghana, and she was born to him and her mother who is light skinned, whose own mother was from Brittany and father from Corsica, is lighter than my own daughter, who has slanted eyes from the Laplander side of my dad' father who was from northern Sweden where the Mongolian influence was, and she is darker than my daughter-in-law whose has African ancestry. In genetics, you can have light skin come out or darker skin depending on what the genes do in fertilization. My granddaughter is so light skinned and blonde that she looks like her mother only in some facial features, and not skin color. People would not know she is the daughter of her mother unless you look closely. My distant cousin's brother married a Thai girl whose first child, a boy had dark skin and the next one, a girl had blond hair and light skin. You would not know by looking at her that the mother and daughter go together unless you know them or look closely. In the past, going back thousands of years to as recent as 100 years ago, most people married no one outside their own religion or neighborhood, almost like incest. We are animals after all."

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24. Bill San Francisco December 25, 2014
"It's time we all stop obsessing over the silly distinctions of skin color, and see us all as one race: human."

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25. Reader New York December 25, 2014
"When black people are no longer discriminated against we can talk about that. When we're all actually treated fairly there will be no need for "obsess[ion]"."

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26. Arty, ma December 25, 2014
"Josh Hill,

I thought you gave me your definition of race. I'm applying it to redheads, and they fit. You haven't explained why you think they don't.
-snip-
This is an exception to my "no note" rule. I'm not sure which comment by Josh Hill Arty is referring to, but Arty might be referring to (what I gather) is Josh Hill's position that physical appearance is the key determinant that most people use to determine race, and that race is also a key determinant regarding how a person is treated."

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27. Josh Hill, New London December 25, 2014
"Arty, I just gave what I think was a fairly comprehensive explanation. If you aren't familiar with the principles of Linnaean taxonomy and cladistics, I'm afraid there's little more I can say here without abusing the comments section. I do think though that you're pettifogging the issue. After all, race is something that can be determined algorithmically by genetic analysis. If it weren't a real quantity, that wouldn't be the case. The scientific (as opposed to social) significance of race is another matter entirely. It certainly has some applications in medicine, e.g., different population groups have different frequencies of certain illnesses -- high blood pressure, Tay Sachs disease, etc. It may also have an impact on diet, e.g., many East Asians have been found to have extra copies of a starch digestion gene. Of course, sub-racial categories are significant too in these regards. Other, more serious possible implications, such as differences in mean IQ, remain controversial and will until more scientific work is done."

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28. LV NJ December 25, 2014
"The analysis regarding Latinos is a little uninformed. Latino is not a race but a broad category of regional and linguistic origin that is ignores national differences. Latinos from Mexico and Central America differ greatly from Latinos of Caribbean ancestry and historical European and African settlement patterns in their countries. The former have more native American ancestry and the latter more African ancestry. So it is obvious that areas of the US where Latinos are primarily Mexican have much different profiles than areas where many are Caribbean."

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29. Larry Lundgren Linköping, Sweden December 25, 2014
"I have submitted one comment and many replies. Since only two minor replies appear I add this final thought.

I have learned today by reading all of the comments and especially a large number by JH, a Verified who sometimes disagrees sharply with me - or appears - to that JH and I actually share the scientific views coming from genome research and our differences lie in how we think about concepts of "race".

I make this suggestion to all of us: If you are going to write anything in which you use "race", first explain the uses to which you think this concept should be put. I would like JH to be the first to explain. Here is my position.

Prof. Roberts, in an elegant Email to me wrote: "I do not believe that ignoring the existence of the political system of race will end racism."

Note: POLITICAL SYSTEM of race. I agree with her completely. The use to which "race" was and is put is to be part of a political system. We see this in Sweden today. The SD party believes that there is an Aryan race that is superior to any other race you might want to name. Need I tell you where they got that view. In World War II there were many Swedes who believed that.

I do not want to be part of any present-day political system that uses "race" as a means of classifying people. In 1922 Sweden created The National Institute of Race Biology to that end. No more.

That is why my blog is Only-NeverInSweden.blogspot.com

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30. Josh Hill, New London December 25, 2014
"Larry, I think I touche don some of this in my reply to your later comment (I'm reading top down) but I don't think that race is something we can wish away, not when there are still ghettos and black kids with hoodies have to fear for their lives. So I'm all in favor of pointing out that we have most of our DNA in common, that there is more historical mixing than most people know (or than this article suggests since the study measured only recent admixture), and that individual genetic differences swamp racial ones (is a Pygmy as likely to be a great runner as a Kenyan). But when people claim that race doesn't exist, well, that's just a fantasy -- a child can see that an Eskimo doesn't look like an African, and genetic testing tells us that there are statistical clusters in areas that are separated by natural barriers that reduce (but don't always halt) gene flow, and can identify them with ever-greater precision.

Claims that race doesn't exist may convince the ideologically committed, but only because their confirmation bias deprives them of objectivity. For others, those claims are like the emperor's new clothes -- so outlandish that they weaken the case for racial equity rather than strengthening it. I think it may mean more to them to know that six million of us "white" Americans aren't completely white at all. The figure is even higher if you include African admixture in people of Mediterranean descent, which this study didn't do."

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Reply
31. Josh Hill, New London December 25, 2014
"Larry, I think it's important to distinguish between science and pseudo-science here. Those who are politically or economically motivated twist science to suit their ends. Nazi Germany is perhaps the most spectacular example of this, but in much of the world race has been used to justify appalling abuses like slavery and apartheid. Often the claims that were made had no real scientific foundation, but were presented as if they did.

By way of contrast, an example of real science might be the observation that people of African descent are more likely to develop high blood pressure.

I think we also have to admit that while progress has been made, we don't really live in a post-racial society. So there are very practical reasons for asking, for example, about race on the census. Without that, we have no measure of black progress in earnings or other measures of social equity.

But to me what comes out most strongly from this and similar studies is that while we can't pretend that race doesn't exist, it isn't an either-or affair. Our genes are shared and mixed -- even more mixed than this recent-horizon study suggests -- and the only fair way to treat people is as individuals. Only then can we avoid the abuses that come from stereotyping people on the basis of group traits, real or imagined."

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32. GM Tokyo December 25, 2014
"It's common for people from parts of southern Europe, such as Sicily, to have a few percent African DNA, so the fact that someone in the US has 1% African DNA wouldn't necessarily mean that that person had an ancestor who was a slave."

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Reply
33. Josh Hill, New London December 25, 2014
"True, however, the 23 and Me results use IIRC 400 years ago as a baseline. That's after the Mediterranean admixture occurred. if the calculations were done in such a way as to include admixture events during say the Roman Empire and the Middle Ages, proportions of African blood would be higher in people of Mediterranean descent. But as things stand, the study measures admixture that typically occurred after the colonization of the Americas. I can see this in my own results -- 23 and Me gives a lower figure for African ancestry than other profiles. (For those who are curious, it's possible to estimate the date of admixture events by measuring the degree of fragmentation of DNA segments -- the smaller the fragments, the longer ago the mixing occurred, on average.)"

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34. Daniel Cocciardi Florida December 25, 2014
"To make the matter even more confusing, Benjamin Franklin once used the term "swarthy" to describe Germans when he discussed immigration. I think "white" according to Franklin was Nordic europeans only. Maybe the other founders adopted the same policy of exclusivity?"

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35. Daphne Philipson Ardsley on Hudson, NY December 25, 2014
"I could never understand why Barack Obama is considered black when he is half black and half white. He is as much white as black but everyone refers to him as black. Go figure..."

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Reply
36. lm1b2 ohio December 25, 2014
"Does He even look white,hardly LOL!:

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Reply
37. Daphne Philipson Ardsley on Hudson, NY December 25, 2014
"Doesn't really matter what he looks like, although he looks like a white man with a tan to me. Everyone knows his story that he is half black, half white but everyone just seems to say he's black."

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Reply
38. greg savannah, ga December 25, 2014
"He is considered black because that's what our race obsessed culture has decided that he is."

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Reply
39. Mart US December 26, 2014
"Wrong, that's what he considers himself to be."

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40. Readers Pick’s [187] no date given
"It was my impression that Dr. Long was merely pointing out that the sample, while quiet large, was based on self-selection (those who sought the genetic testing and also agreed to let their results be included in the research), and not a "random sample" of the entire U.S. population. It's a good point. What you characterize as his "speculation," isn't quite, but rather a suggestion of how that self-selection could affect the fascinating findings reported as compared, that is, to findings from a truly randomized (and equally large) sample.

I was under the impression that some years ago the National Geographic Society was initiating similar research, but on a global basis. Has anyone here seen any reporting on such a study -- where it stands, what it found?"

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Reply
41. Josh Hill, New London December 25, 2014
"H. almost sapines, you can read about the National Geographic project here:

http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2014/12/03/new-genographic-y-chromosome-tree/

It focuses more on deep ancestry, e.g., early human migrations rather than the within-the-last=400-years mixing that I believe characterizes the 23 and Me study. I sent my DNA to both but I found the 23 and Me results much more interesting."

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42. Charles Washington DC December 25, 2014
" “Perhaps people who have mixed ancestry are more interested in their ancestry than people who don’t think they have mixed ancestry,” Dr. Long said. This is pure speculation of course. It is also possible that people who have mixed ancestry are LESS interested in their ancestry. At this point there is no way to parse this out.

No one should be surprised by the findings of this study. We are all mixed. "Race" is more a cultural concept than a biological one. The genes that guide the development of external features and skin tone are few compared to the total 24,000 genes that guide embryonic development. Thus, some African Americans with very dark skin may have more European ancestry than other African Americans who have very light skin color."

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43. Rocky California December 25, 2014
"The US is still as hung up on race as Germany was about religion during and before The Third Reich. A 1900 survey for Frankfurt Am Main gave a statistical breakdown of income categories to the second decimal place. In case you were wondering, the Jews came out on top and the Catholics were at the bottom, with the Protestants in the middle. (from Hinhaus aus dem Ghetto Juden in Frankfurt am Main 1800-1950). During the Third Reich, men who wanted to join the SS had to prove 250 years of racial purity (no Jewish blood).

There aren't many Americans 100% anything and the first white Americans didn't come over on the Mayflower or to the Virginia colony. Linda Chavez, a former Ronald Reagan appointee, can trace her American ancestry back to 16th century New Mexico, to which her Sephardic Jewish paternal ancestors had fled after converting to Catholicism under pressure during the Spanish Inquisition. Linda Chavez is one of the guests featured in the PBS documentary "Find Your Roots". By coincidence, her husband is Jewish."

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44. Reuven Orlando, FL December 25, 2014
"Interesting, that the very vilified George Zimmerman, who was 1/8 African American, would have been "Black" under Virginia law. (NY Times had to invent weasel-words to try to make him white, calling him a "white hispanic"--a term they never used before.)"

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Reply
45. Josh Hill, New London December 25, 2014
"Well, in truth, those of us who are 1/8 black or less are usually referred to as white these days. That for example is what my birth certificate and driver's license say. That wasn't the case 50 or 100 years ago, but if the Times were to call someone like Zimmerman black now, it would create no end of puzzlement.

Of course, some people still use the one drop rule, as some of the posts here illustrate, but I think they're in the minority (when I checked into that a few years ago, no scientifically valid surveys had been done). And there's some controversy within the black community over this, with some feeling that people abandon their black identity the moment it's convenient. But even if one droppers don't know you're part black, they'll just assume you're white, so it doesn't really have an effect."

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46. Citizen Seattle December 25, 2014
"I'm proud to be a mongrel-american. Genetically three fourths of me is mostly European, one eighth is black, and most of the other eighth is native american. I wasn't sure about the black part until 23 and me results confirmed it.

Because I was adopted in a white family and look white I'll never suffer the same sort of discrimination others face. But knowing ancestors likely came via slave ship, how someone with my makeup would have fared in the old south, and historical facts about how it affected a grandfather certainly affects my thoughts.

That combines with understanding of the persecution and hardship my biological and adoptive European ancestors experienced before arriving here and how they fared after.

Having more people realize that they have those links is probably all to the good. I don't claim the effect would be other than subtle, but I think it would be beneficial for the most part as we consider both racial and immigration issues.

Data about distribution of genes in the population may shake beliefs of some of those who still think there are sharp biological lines between races. A few minds might change for the good although others among them may just shift to using other rationales to support toxic beliefs.

The crazies may try to fit the statistics in with their predictions and worst fears of admixture. But most people in the general population will come to understand this blending as a positive thing,"

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47. RE Ellis Hong Kong December 26, 2014
"Actually this study proves that most American Whites are emphatically NOT particularly mixed, whereas most blacks have a significant White component."

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48. Fred Palo Alto, CA December 26, 2014
"Nothing new:
"Although racial segregation was adopted legally by southern states of the former Confederacy in the late 19th century, legislators resisted defining race by law to prevent interracial marriages. In 1895 in South Carolina during discussion, George D. Tillman said,

It is a scientific fact that there is not one full-blooded Caucasian on the floor of this convention. Every member has in him a certain mixture of... colored blood...It would be a cruel injustice and the source of endless litigation, of scandal, horror, feud, and bloodshed to undertake to annul or forbid marriage for a remote, perhaps obsolete trace of Negro blood. The doors would be open to scandal, malice, and greed." From Wikipedia."

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49. Apowell232, Great Lakes December 26, 2014
"There is nothing wrong in being both WHITE in racial identity AND of multiracial ancestry. The only thing new about it is that it is finally losing its stigma."

http://melungeon.ning.com/forum/topics/5th-union-presentation-by-a-d-powell

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Names Of The Days Of The Week In Five Afroasiatic Languages That Are Spoken In Ethiopia

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post provides information about Ethiopia, Northeast Africa. This post also provides information and lists for names of days of the week in five major Afroasiatic languages in Ethiopia: Amharic, Oromo, Sidaama (Sidama, Sidamo), Somali, and Tigrinya.

Some of these languages may also be spoken in certain other surrounding nations. That information is provided in the summaries that are given below about those languages.

This post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series that provides information about and lists for day names in various African languages. Click the "African languages days of the week" tag to find other posts in this ongoing series.

The content of this post is presented for linguistic, cultural, and educational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

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GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT ETHIOPIA
Excerpt #1:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethiopia
"Ethiopia ... officially the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia ... is a country located in the Horn of Africa. It shares borders with Eritrea to the north and northeast, Djibouti and Somalia to the east, Sudan and South Sudan to the west, and Kenya to the south. With nearly 100 million inhabitants,[3] Ethiopia is the most populous landlocked country in the world, as well as the second-most populous nation on the African continent after Nigeria. It occupies a total area of 1,100,000 square kilometres (420,000 sq mi), and its capital and largest city is Addis Ababa.[3]

Some of the oldest evidence for anatomically modern humans has been found in Ethiopia.[9] It is widely considered as the region from which modern humans first set out for the Middle East and places beyond.[10][11][12] According to linguists, the first Afroasiatic-speaking populations settled in the Horn region during the ensuing Neolithic era.[13] Tracing its roots to the 2nd millennium BC, Ethiopia was a monarchy for most of its history. During the first centuries AD, the Kingdom of Aksum maintained a unified civilization in the region,[14][15][16][17] followed by the Ethiopian Empire circa 1137. Ethiopia derived prestige with its uniquely successful military resistance during the late 19th-century Scramble for Africa, becoming the only African country to defeat a European colonial power and retain its sovereignty. Subsequently, many African nations adopted the colors of Ethiopia's flag following their independence.* It was the first independent African member of the 20th-century League of Nations and the United Nations.

[...]

According to Ethnologue, there are ninety individual languages spoken in Ethiopia.[182] Most people in the country speak Afroasiatic languages of the Cushitic or Semitic branches. The former includes Oromiffa, spoken by the Oromo, and Somali, spoken by the Somalis; the latter includes Amharic, spoken by the Amhara, and Tigrinya, spoken by the Tigrayans. Together, these four groups make up about three-quarters of Ethiopia's population. Other Afroasiatic languages with a significant number of speakers include the Cushitic Sidamo, Afar, Hadiyya and Agaw languages, as well as the Semitic Gurage languages, Harari, Silt'e, Argobba languages.[5] Arabic, which also belongs to the Afroasiatic family, is likewise spoken in some areas.[183]

Additionally, Omotic languages are spoken by Omotic ethnic minority groups inhabiting the southern regions. Among these idioms are Aari, Bench, Dime, Dizin, Gamo-Gofa-Dawro, Maale, Hamer, and Wolaytta.[5]
Languages from the Nilo-Saharan family are also spoken by ethnic minorities concentrated in the southwestern parts of the country. These languages include Nuer, Anuak, Nyangatom, Majang, Suri, Me'en, and Mursi.[5]

English is the most widely spoken foreign language, and is the medium of instruction in secondary schools. Amharic was the language of primary school instruction, but has been replaced in many areas by regional languages such as Oromiffa, Somali or Tigrinya.[184] While all languages enjoy equal state recognition in the 1995 Constitution of Ethiopia, Amharic is recognized as the official working language of the Federal Government.[1] The various regions of Ethiopia and chartered cities are free to determine their own working languages."....

[...]

Languages of Ethiopia as of 2007 Census.[5]
Oromo (33.80%)
Amharic (29.33%)
Somali (6.25%)
Tigrinya (5.86%)
Sidamo (4.04%)
Wolaytta (2.21%)
Gurage (2.01%)
Afar (1.74%)
Hadiyya (1.70%)
Gamo-Gofa-Dawro (1.45%)
Other (11.61%)
-snip-
* From https://flagspot.net/flags/et.html:
"Many African countries adopted the colours of the Ethiopian flag on their flags when they achieved independence which, together with black, became known as the Pan-African colours."

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Excerpt #2
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horn_of_Africa
"The Horn of Africa ... is a peninsula in Northeast Africa. It juts hundreds of kilometers into the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean, lying along the southern side of the Gulf of Aden. The area is the easternmost projection of the African continent. The Horn of Africa denotes the region containing the countries of Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Somalia.[1][2][3][4]

[...]

Ethnicity and languages
Besides sharing similar geographic endowments, the countries of the Horn of Africa are, for the most part, linguistically and ethnically linked together,[4] evincing a complex pattern of interrelationships among the various groups.[79]

According to Ethnologue, there are 10 individual languages spoken in Djibouti, 14 in Eritrea, 90 in Ethiopia, and 15 in Somalia.[80] Most people in the Horn speak Afroasiatic languages of the Cushitic or Semitic branches. The former includes Oromo, spoken by the Oromo people in Ethiopia, and Somali, spoken by the Somali people in Somalia, Djibouti and Ethiopia; the latter includes Amharic, spoken by the Amhara people of Ethiopia, and Tigrinya, spoken by the Tigrinyas of Eritrea and Tigrayans of Ethiopia, respectively. Other Afroasiatic languages with a significant number of speakers include the Cushitic Afar, Saho, Hadiyya, Sidamo and Agaw languages, as well as the Semitic Tigre, Gurage, Harari, Silt'e and Argobba tongues.[81]

Additionally, Omotic languages are spoken by Omotic communities inhabiting Ethiopia's southern regions. Among these idioms are Aari, Dizi, Gamo, Kafa, Hamer and Wolaytta.[82]

Languages belonging to the Nilo-Saharan and Niger-Congo families are also spoken in some areas by Nilotic and Bantu ethnic minorities, respectively. These tongues include the Nilo-Saharan Me'en and Mursi languages used in southwestern Ethiopia, and Kunama and Nara idioms spoken in parts of southern Eritrea. In the riverine and littoral areas of southern Somalia, Bajuni, Barawani, and Bantu groups also speak variants of the Niger-Congo Swahili and Mushunguli languages.[8]"...

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NAMES OF THE WEEK IN FIVE TRADITIONAL AFRICAN LANGUAGES THAT ARE SPOKEN IN ETHIOPIA
(These languages are given in alphabetical order.)

Amharic
Excerpt #1:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amharic
"Amharic (አማርኛ) ... Amharic: Amarəñña, is an Afro-Asiatic language of the Semitic branch. It is spoken as a mother tongue by the Amhara in Ethiopia. The language serves as the official working language of Ethiopia, and is also the official or working language of several of the states within the federal system.[10] Amharic is the second-most widely spoken Semitic language in the world after Arabic....

Background
It has been the working language of courts, language of trade and everyday communications, the military, and the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church since the late 12th century and remains the official language of Ethiopia today.[11][12] Amharic is spoken by 22 million native speakers in Ethiopia and 15 million secondary speakers in Ethiopia.[11][1] Additionally, 3 million emigrants outside of Ethiopia speak the language. Most of the Ethiopian Jewish communities in Ethiopia and Israel speak Amharic. In Washington DC, Amharic became one of the six non-English languages in the Language Access Act of 2004, which allows government services and education in Amharic.[13] Furthermore, Amharic is considered a holy language by the Rastafari (ራስ ተፈሪ) religion and is widely used among its followers worldwide. It is the most widely spoken language in the Horn of Africa.[14]"...

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Excerpt #2:
From https://ethiopia.limbo13.com/index.php/amharic_seasons_months_weeks/
"Days of the week:
Monday - säñño ሳኞ
Tuesday - maksäñño ማክሰኞ
Wednesday - räbu / rob ረቡ / ሮብ
Thursday - amus / hamus አሙስ / ኀሙስ
Friday - arb አርብ
Saturday - k’ïdame ቅዳሜ
Sunday - ïhud እሑድ"

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Oromo (Afaan Oromo)
Excerpt #1:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oromo_language
"Oromo ... is an Afroasiatic language. It is the most widely spoken tongue in the family's Cushitic branch. Forms of Oromo are spoken as a first language by more than 24.6 million Oromo people and neighboring peoples in Ethiopia, and by an additional half million in parts of northern and eastern Kenya.[6] It is also spoken by smaller numbers of emigrants in other African countries such as South Africa, Libya, Egypt, and Sudan. Oromo is a dialect continuum; not all varieties are mutually intelligible. The native name for the Oromo language is "Afaan Oromo", which translates to "mouth (language) of Oromo." It was formerly known as "Galla", a term now considered pejorative but still found in older literature.

[...]

Speakers
About 85 percent of Oromo speakers live in Ethiopia, mainly in Oromia Region. In addition, in Somalia there are also some speakers of the language.[7] In Kenya, the Ethnologue also lists 722,000 speakers of Borana and Orma, two languages closely related to Ethiopian Oromo.[8] Within Ethiopia, Oromo is the language with the largest number of native speakers.

Within Africa, Oromo is the language with the fourth most speakers, after Arabic (if one counts the mutually unintelligible spoken forms of Arabic as a single language and assumes the same for the varieties of Oromo), Swahili, and Hausa.

Besides first language speakers, a number of members of other ethnicities who are in contact with the Oromo speak it as a second language. See for example, the Omotic-speaking Bambassi and the Nilo-Saharan-speaking Kwama in northwestern Oromiyaa.[9]

[...]

Oromo is written with a Latin alphabet called Qubee which was formally adopted in 1991.[10] Various versions of the Latin-based orthography had been used previously, mostly by Oromos outside of Ethiopia and by the OLF by the late 1970s (Heine 1986).[11] With the adoption of Qubee, it is believed more texts were written in the Oromo language between 1991 and 1997 than in the previous 100 years. In Kenya, the Borana and Waata also use Roman letters but with different systems"...
-snip-
*I added italics to this sentence to highlight it.

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Excerpt #2:
From http://ilanguages.org/oromo_vocabulary.php
Days of the week [Omoro]

Monday: dafinoo / ojja duree
Tuesday: facaasaa
Wednesday: roobii
Thursday: kamisa
Friday: jimaata
Saturday: sambata xinnaa / sambata duraa
Sunday: dilbata / sambata guddaa

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Sidaama (Sidama, Sidamo)
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sidamo_language
"Sidaama or Sidaamu Afoo is an Afro-Asiatic language, belonging to the Highland East Cushitic branch of the Cushitic family. It is spoken in parts of southern Ethiopia by the Sidama people, particularly in the densely populated Sidama Zone. Sidaamu Afoo is the ethnic autonym for the language, while Sidaminya is its name in Amharic. Although it is not known to have any specific dialects, it shares over 64% lexical similarity with Alaba-K'abeena, 62% with Kambaata, and 53% with Hadiyya, all of which are other languages spoken in southwestern Ethiopia.

The term Sidamo has also been used by some authors to refer to larger groupings of East Cushitic and even Omotic languages.[4] The languages within this Sidamo grouping contain similar, alternating phonological features.[5] The results from a research study conducted in 1968-1969 concerning mutual intelligibility between different Sidamo languages suggest that Sidaama is more closely related to the Gedeo language, which it shares a border with to the south, than other Sidamo languages.[6] According to the Ethnologue, the two languages share a lexical similarity of 60%.[7] Sidaama vocabulary has been influenced by Ge'ez and Amharic, and has in turn influenced Oromo vocabulary."...

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Excerpt #2:
From https://hawassasidama.wordpress.com/2013/08/05/fichchee-the-sidama-peoples-new-year-celebration-as-one-of-most-distinguished-peculiar-features-of-the-sidama-people/ FICHCHEE: The Sidama people’s New Year Celebration as one of the most distinguished peculiar features of the Sidama people, by MTT
Hawassa, Sidama, Ethiopia, 05 August 2013
..."Based on investigation findings of the Ayyantto (“Sidama astrologists”) and according to established calendar Sidama has a week comprising of five days. Names of days of the week were derived from market days occurring in different places and were name as Diko, Deella, Kawaado and Kawalanka respectively."...
-snip-
Please add to this section on the names for days of the week in Sidaama (Sidama).

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Somali
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Somali_language
"Somali is an Afroasiatic language belonging to the Cushitic branch. It is spoken as a mother tongue by Somalis in Greater Somalia and the Somali diaspora. Somali is an official language of Somalia, a national language in Djibouti, and a working language in the Somali Region of Ethiopia. It is used as an adoptive language by a few neighboring ethnic minority groups and individuals. The Somali is written officially with the Latin alphabet.

Classification
Somali is classified within the Cushitic branch of the Afroasiatic family; specifically, as Lowland East Cushitic along with Afar and Saho.[6] Somali is the best-documented Cushitic language,[7] with academic studies of the language dating back to the late 19th century.[8]

Geographic distribution
Somali is spoken by Somalis in Somalia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Yemen and Kenya, and by the Somali diaspora. It is also spoken as an adoptive language by a few ethnic minority groups and individuals in these areas.
Somali is the second most widely spoken Cushitic language after Oromo.[9]

As of 2006, there were approximately 16.6 million speakers of Somali, of which around 8.3 million resided in Somalia.[10] The language is spoken by an estimated 95% of the country's inhabitants,[8] and also by a majority of the population in Djibouti.[7]

Following the start of the Somali Civil War in the early 1990s, the Somali-speaking diaspora increased in size, with newer Somali speech communities forming in parts of the Middle East, North America and Europe.[10]"...

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Excerpt #2:
From https://www.facebook.com/LearningSomali/posts/236327081793 Learn the Somali Language, January 6, 2010
"Days of the Week:
Isniin: Monday
Talaado : Tuesday
Arbaco : Wednesday
Khamiis : Thursday
Jimco : Friday
Sabti : Saturday
Axad : Sunday"

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Tigrinya
Excerpt #1:
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tigrinya_language
"Tigrinya (often written as Tigrigna;.... is an Afroasiatic language of the Semitic branch. It is mainly spoken in Eritrea and northern Ethiopia in the Horn of Africa, with around 6,915,000 total speakers. Tigrinya speakers in Ethiopia (known as Tigrayans; Tigrawot; feminine Tigrāweyti, male Tigraway, plural Tegaru) number around 4,320,000 individuals, and are centered in the northern Tigray Region. The Tigrinya speakers in Eritrea (Tigrinyas) total roughly 2,540,000, and are concentrated in the southern and central areas. Tigrinya is also spoken by emigrants from these regions, including some Beta Israel.[4]

Tigrinya should not be confused with the related Tigre language. The latter is spoken by the Tigre people, who inhabit the lowland regions of Eritrea to the north and west of the Tigrinya speech area...

Tigrinya is the third most spoken language in Ethiopia after Amharic and Oromo, and the most widely spoken language in Eritrea (see languages). It is also spoken by large immigrant communities around the world, in countries including Sudan, Saudi Arabia, Israel, Germany, Italy, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Canada and the United States. In Australia, Tigrinya is one of the languages broadcast on public radio via the multicultural Special Broadcasting Service.[11]

Tigrinya dialects differ phonetically, lexically, and grammatically.[12] No dialect appears to be accepted as a standard."...

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Excerpt #2
From http://www.eritrea.be/old/eritrea-languages.htm Days of the week in Tigrinya
"Monday - Senuy
Tuesday - Selus
Wednesday - Rebu 'a
Thursday - Hamus
Friday - Arbi
Saturday - Kadam
Sunday - Senbet"

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